Friday link roundup 8/18

From Alternet: 10 healthy food essentials that you can easily make at home.

From The Atlantic: Hidden texts: Uncovering ancient languages from manuscripts from a monastery library on the Sinai Peninsula.

If you enjoy Game of Thrones, here are some epic fantasy books written by women.

Target just unveiled a sensory-friendly clothing line for kids.

From NPR: Many nurses lack the knowledge of health risks to mothers post-childbirth.

Four organizations fighting racism to donate to following the violence in Charlottesville. How to talk to kids about what happened in Charlottesville.

Children’s books about race and social justice.

On the continuing effects of the Civil War and the significance of statues and monuments.

The power of sharing my own experience.

A conversation with friend from earlier this week:

“You probably haven’t had to deal with stuff like this,” she said, after describing how she’d been feeling lately.

“Depression?”

She nodded. “Well, actually, I have,” I said, and elaborated about my own experience.

Afterward, she thanked me for sharing. She knew then that I could relate to how she was feeling.

This moment allowed me to see how incredibly validating it was for me to share my personal experience — for both my friend and for me.

When I was in the midst of my most severe depressive episode, I know that I often felt very alone and isolated in my experience. I think that affirming for someone that she is not alone may have been a powerful gift. Yes, it required vulnerability. It required me to tread into topics I don’t usually touch on in everyday conversations. It gave me the opportunity to rely on my inner strength and know that I could be — and was — okay to give support in that moment.

I felt cautious with this interaction, both during and afterwards. I know I am not necessarily fragile now, but I see the darkness within myself, the potential for becoming depressed again. These kinds of interactions have the potential to be draining and triggering. But I also realize that in many ways, this gives me an opportunity to establish boundaries when needed while also providing the kind of support that only one who has been through something similar can provide. I won’t offer solutions, but I can offer my own story and share what helped me.

It helped me to share, too. Sometimes I feel like I only give people parts of my story. True, not everyone has earned my trust to hear more. But it was important for me to have a moment where I let my guard down, especially when it seemed appropriate and needed. So perhaps I received a gift in that moment as well.

Friday link roundup 8/11

U.S. Surgeons General call for an end to surgery on intersex infants.

Society double standards depicted in 10+ illustrations and comics.

A parents’ movement to wait until high school to allow their children to have cell phones.

One woman’s reflection on what to say when people ask why you’re not having children.

More on the solar eclipse: See what it will look like from anywhere in the United States.

A short video on why honeybees create perfect hexagons in their hive.

Friday link roundup 8/4

From Rachel Schneider: On being a new parent with sensory processing disorder.

From Jessica Valenti: On being “matronly” and one-piece bathing suits.

Photographer and artist Cindy Sherman just made her Instagram account public.

Want to know more about the solar eclipse coming up later this month? So much interesting information here.

Space between.

This is a short note of gratitude to parks. Today, stopping at a park punctuated my time between Nia demos (two scheduled in the same day…perhaps more on that in a later post). I had brought my lunch along, so I found a place to sit in the grass and took the time to eat. It was nice to sit and have my solo picnic, to feel the grass beneath me, to feel gratitude for the tree that was providing me shade.

Also, it helped me transition from one event to another more easily. I didn’t stay there long, but it was enough to give me a little space and breathing room.

tree

It was a good reminder of how refreshing it can be to stop and pause, even just for a few minutes.

Friday link roundup 7/28

From the New York Times: 5 takeaways from last night’s vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

This map shows the most popular attraction in each state in the U.S.

10 years after an urban bridge collapsed in Minneapolis, a survivor tells her story.

There’s a trend in U.S. kindergartens of more work and less play.

According to a recent study, fairy tales may be older than originally thought.

The military spends more on Viagra than on transgender service members’ health care. Stories of several transgender people who served in the military.

Friday link roundup 7/21

A group of young women from Afghanistan headed for an international robotics competition were initially denied visas to enter the United States, but later received permission to come. During the competition, the team won a silver medal for courageous achievement.

Ever been told to change how you think when you’re feeling stressed out? This blog post talks about how the stress response is based in the nervous system, not in your thoughts.

A post with great wisdom on giving support: Hold your tongue and offer your heart instead.

In terms of discussing issues like drug abuse and addiction (as well as other topics), who tells the story and how they tell it can affect public perception and opinion and even policy. Here’s a post urging people to  Just Say No to Media Coverage of Drugs.  I would also recommend looking for alternate sources and seeking the bigger picture.