Posts Tagged ‘art’

Update in pictures

Aside from the link roundups, I haven’t posted much lately. I thought I’d use a few photos to give a glimpse into my life currently. Maybe I’ll do this on a regular basis.

proofreading books

My proofreading reference books. I spent about half this year gradually going through an online course on how to proofread transcripts for court reporters. I finished the course in July and started marketing in the later part of last month. So far, I’ve had a few jobs and two clients. I’m definitely feeling the freelancing life out. In the long run, I hope it picks up; in the meantime, I’m glad that I’ve started.

morning light

I love the soft light in the mornings. Also, the temperatures in the mornings — and in general — are getting cooler. We also turned our air conditioning off (at least for the time being)! Yay!

tree of life earrings

I was at a networking and vendor event on Tuesday, and a customer asked if I could turn these pendants into earrings. This is the result, and I really like how they turned out.

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Friday link roundup 8/4

From Rachel Schneider: On being a new parent with sensory processing disorder.

From Jessica Valenti: On being “matronly” and one-piece bathing suits.

Photographer and artist Cindy Sherman just made her Instagram account public.

Want to know more about the solar eclipse coming up later this month? So much interesting information here.

Friday link roundup 6/2

Need a dose of laughter? 14 female cartoonists to follow.

From Buzzfeed:  a week of lunches on a $20 budget.

In light of the president withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, mayors of numerous U.S. cities are affirming their commitment to it.

This piece from NPR looks at five things that could possibly change (in the U.S. and worldwide) in response to the U.S. withdrawing from the climate deal.

A reflection of the history of the Golden Gate Bridge as it turns 80.

Wonder Woman comes out in theaters today and is getting good reviews. A review with thoughts on female representation. This article reflects on whether Wonder Woman will change the luck (and prevalence) of superhero movies starring female characters.

Today is apparently National Doughnut Day in the U.S. Here’s a list of places that are offering deals (free, or free with purchase). Now, if you’ll excuse me while I go satisfy that sudden (and effectively marketed) craving….

 

Friday link roundup 5/26

Same-sex marriage is now legal in Taiwan.

Fidget spinners are becoming popular. This writer thinks that may be problematic.

How a one hour walk, three times a week, benefits people with dementia.

How Jean-Michel Basquiat became the ultimate American artist.

The author of this article believes that the Manchester attack was aimed at women and girls.

Life: celebrate, honor, live.

Life paintingI posted this on my social media pages along with this caption:  “Painting/drawing in honor of life, of choosing to live, learning to thrive, and being true to myself. On this date three years ago, I was severely depressed and hit rock bottom. Today, I honor my healing and all the choices that led me to where I am today.”

On May 25, 2013, I was hospitalized for severe depression and suicidal ideations.

I’ve been feeling the anniversary energy this month – more strongly than this time last year, but less strongly than the first year. In this energy, there’s an intensity, sadness, grief, determination, and more. In time, that energy will likely change or fade. In any case, I hope that I’ll take many more moments to acknowledge and celebrate my life, to celebrate living.

Year One.

Year Two.

Stepping through and past stuck-ness.

I remember taking Intro to Drawing in college. I went to a college with a block plan, which meant I took one class intensively for three and a half weeks. That meant my mornings were filled with instruction and demonstrations, and I spent my afternoons and evenings doing homework.

At some point in the middle of the course, as we were working on drawing boxes with dimensions, shading, and foreshortening, I began to feel stuck. I wasn’t the only one; the professor commented that many of us seemed stuck within the technique. We weren’t necessarily having fun. I know that I was focused on getting it “right,” and there wasn’t a lot of joy in it.

So my professor gave us a creative assignment, to draw whatever we liked, to draw without a subject, be abstract, whatever we needed to be. For me, it had the effect of shaking off the previous weight and allowing me learn the techniques while being a little less attached to the final result, and most of all, enjoying the process of working with the materials, such as ink and charcoal.

Sometimes, as I continue to deepen my practice of Nia and learn how to teach, I get caught in getting in wanting to be accurate, precise. I’ll get some feedback, I’ll think about it, I’ll take it into my movements. And maybe, as I practice, my movements will become more precise. But sometimes in this process, I lose the sense of pleasure in my movement. And since White Belt Principle #1 in Nia is the Joy of Movement, and Nia is something I genuinely enjoy, this feels problematic and counterproductive. During these times, I feel stuck in a similar way that I did in my college drawing class — in short, creatively stymied.

The other night, I went searching through emails from Nia Headquarters, trying to find a specific phrase that another teacher had referenced. Instead, I found this, a section from a newsletter written by Debbie Rosas, co-founder of Nia:

“If you’re feeling overwhelmed, know this – feeling overwhelmed comes from believing that you have to perform a certain way and at a certain time….Learning Nia has never been about performing. It is about connecting, relationships, joy, meaning, purpose, health, and well-being. And about saying what you sense and know. The result of doing Nia has always been the gift of self-healing and conditioning.

“I’m here to tell you: I don’t care if you miss the music cue or you cue between the three and the six. It is okay if you can’t do all the moves perfectly. It is okay if you can’t find the beat. What is not okay is if you deny what you know and don’t know. That keeps you down and stops you from getting where you want to go and be…”

I read this and felt relieved almost instantly. Yes, it’s important that I continue to learn and improve. It is absolutely essential that I continue to play, be creative, and enjoy what I do. Yesterday, I danced through a routine and focused only on finding and sharing what I sense. I gave myself permission to Free Dance through parts of it, too.  Afterward, I felt both more grounded and more joyful. It was good reminder for myself that I don’t have to tackle a bunch of approaches at once; one or two at a time can be more than enough, and that it doesn’t necessarily have to look a certain way.

And some more encouragement for me: Today, I talked to a studio owner about teaching Nia there, and I’m planning to teach a series (likely in April!) to try it out. So here’s to taking steps towards what I want to do.

 

Friday link roundup 3/3

Outerwear that would be great for refugees in camps, homeless people, campers, and more. The company Adiff’s humanitarian-oriented inventions including reflective jackets and jackets that turn into tents or sleeping bags. Here’s their kickstarter campaign.

An Iraqi artist in the Australian refugee detention center on Nauru describes how his art saves him.

Ten books to read when you’re feeling anxious.

“Is she literally a cat?” Playboy’s (suprisingly) insightful flow chart about whether to catcall women.

A track-by-track guide to Tori Amos’ acclaimed album Little Earthquakes from Rolling Stone. 

How a girl from a remote Nepali village became a world-class trail runner.

The most common job in every state.  A look at the most common jobs in each U.S. state from 1978 to 2014.

Research shows that artists have structurally different brains.
On March 8, many  women in the United States are planning on participating in a strike to demonstrate the impact of women workers. How to spend March 8 – “A Day Without a Woman” – if you can’t take the day off.