Posts Tagged ‘culture’

Friday link roundup 8/18

From Alternet: 10 healthy food essentials that you can easily make at home.

From The Atlantic: Hidden texts: Uncovering ancient languages from manuscripts from a monastery library on the Sinai Peninsula.

If you enjoy Game of Thrones, here are some epic fantasy books written by women.

Target just unveiled a sensory-friendly clothing line for kids.

From NPR: Many nurses lack the knowledge of health risks to mothers post-childbirth.

Four organizations fighting racism to donate to following the violence in Charlottesville. How to talk to kids about what happened in Charlottesville.

Children’s books about race and social justice.

On the continuing effects of the Civil War and the significance of statues and monuments.

Link roundup 7/15

First look at the new A Wrinkle in Time trailer.

On the contracting and expanding nature of grief.

A Delaware-sized iceberg broke off of Antarctica.

A teacher’s perspective on name-shaming in classrooms and the potential of underlying racism.

Hug a baby, grow a brain. Why hugging babies and young children may increase brain growth and intelligence.

Great story of people coming together for the greater good: A family got caught in a riptide off of the Florida coast and beachgoers formed a human chain and saved them.

Friday link roundup 7/7

An introverted yoga teacher reflects on her experience.

A stage actress who has had parts in the musical wrote a sequel to Fiddler on the Roof.

How did kids from Germany and Cameroon fare on a study on self-control? Read this to find out.

A town in Italy started using silent fireworks to help their animals, who often get distressed by the noise.

About a feminist retirement home in Paris.

How well do you know the shape of each state? From Time: An exercise in drawing the 50 U.S. States.

The public comment period for the national monuments under review by the U.S. Department of the Interior ends on July 10th.  Follow this link to post your comments.

 

Link roundup

The past few days have gotten away from me. But here are a few links I gathered this past week:

Like cats? Visit the American Museum of the House Cat.

Children today spend less time playing outside than in past decades. How to reclaim play for today’s — and future — children.

Putting disability and poverty in context: Generations, Disabled AND IN POVERTY: A Response to The Washington Post. Washington Post article here.

The oldest Homo sapiens fossils recently found in Morocco.

Friday link roundup 6/2

Need a dose of laughter? 14 female cartoonists to follow.

From Buzzfeed:  a week of lunches on a $20 budget.

In light of the president withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, mayors of numerous U.S. cities are affirming their commitment to it.

This piece from NPR looks at five things that could possibly change (in the U.S. and worldwide) in response to the U.S. withdrawing from the climate deal.

A reflection of the history of the Golden Gate Bridge as it turns 80.

Wonder Woman comes out in theaters today and is getting good reviews. A review with thoughts on female representation. This article reflects on whether Wonder Woman will change the luck (and prevalence) of superhero movies starring female characters.

Today is apparently National Doughnut Day in the U.S. Here’s a list of places that are offering deals (free, or free with purchase). Now, if you’ll excuse me while I go satisfy that sudden (and effectively marketed) craving….

 

Friday link roundup 4/21

Netflix has released a series called 13 Reasons Why, based on the book by the same name. While I’ve read plot synopses, I’ve never read or watched either one (my choice). The story is centers around a teenager who dies by suicide and the tapes she leaves behind to describe what (and who) contributed to her decision. I’m sharing articles about the series because the show addresses sensitive topics, and I think raising mental health and suicide awareness is important — and it’s also important to make an informed decision on whether to watch the show (or things to consider if you do). So, trigger warning in these articles for mentions and discussions of suicide, rape, and sexual harassment and assault.  A guide to the series for parents and teachers.  First-person articles from people who have watched it: Why I Wish I Didn’t Watch ’13 Reasons Why.’  4 Important Lessons From ’13 Reasons Why.’  About the show’s visual choices and using teen iconography.  From someone who lost a friend as a teen: 13 Reasons Why Tells a Captivating Story, but Not My Story.  How the show’s promise to raise teen mental health awareness backfired.  On how the show addresses rape culture.

Have some nostalgia with a show that depicts the background of an infamous fictional thief: A future Netflix release that might excite people who grew up in the ’90s: Carmen Sandiego! I don’t know how many hours I spent playing “Where in the World…” then “Where in Time…” on my computer, in addition to watching the PBS game show. I think I also watched the cartoon series a few times, too.

Creative Action Network: A global community of artist and designers making art with purpose. Plus, you can submit your own art that follow the different sayings and themes!

Live updates of the March for Science from all around the world.

There’s a theory that there are four types of introversion.

A few reactions to Starbucks’ limited-time-only Unicorn Frappuccino. What I’ve heard from people I know: “It’s sweet,” and “I’m not sure about this…”

Friday link roundup 3/24

Dedication

Quote: To the girl who reads by flashlight/ who sees dragons in the clouds/ who feels most alive in worlds that never were/ who knows magic is real/who dreams…This is for you.  -Dedication from Hunted by Meagan Spooner

 

 

One woman’s journey from anorexia to body positivity.

A 19-year-old artist confronts stereotypes of black male teens through joyful photographs.

An exploration about the importance of of balance as a sense.

Is it more important to console children immediately, let them cry and express their emotions, or tell them to buck up? This article weighs in.

“One hundred years ago, people had a very different idea of what it means to be heterosexual. Understanding that shift in thinking can tell us a lot about fluid sexual identities today.” – From this fascinating article about heterosexuality.

Is there a high cost and disadvantage to having greater emotional intelligence and empathy?

Research shows that electing more women changes the way government works.

Breaking: the American Health Care Act, the bill that was intended to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, has just been withdrawn in the U.S. Congress.