Posts Tagged ‘current issues’

Friday link roundup 9/1

Wow, it’s September.

About a few of the women who were kidnapped by Boko Haram who escaped, and what their lives look like now.

About the devastating floods in South Asia.

About Amy McGrath, a retired military fighter pilot from Kentucky, and her upcoming campaign for Congress.

A friend who is in the late stages of her first pregnancy shared this article about the last days of pregnancy, a space of being in-between.

What do different animals see when they look in a mirror? This National Geographic article explores the answers to this question.

Five examples of people helping Hurricane Harvey evacuees.

Post-Hurricane Harvey ~ Some ways to give:

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Link roundup 8/26

Yesterday included auditioning to teach Nia classes at a gym and submitting my first proofreading job. It was like super audition day/week or something. So I did not get around to posting links.

Latest updates on Hurricane (now tropical storm) Harvey.

How Amazon’s acquiring Whole Foods will change the health food chain in terms of prices and discounts.

An interview with Vanessa Adrianna Nadal, amazing lawyer and engineer (who also happens to be the wife of playwright/composer/lyricist Lin-Manuel Miranda).

10 + of the Best Pictures of 2017 Solar Eclipse. (It was cloudy here, but I enjoyed watching NASA’s live broadcast).

A syllabus for white people to educate themselves about race, privilege, history, and more — a crowdsourced Google Docs with great links and resources.

How U.S. presidents ended up with the power to pardon.

Friday link roundup 6/30

Three big myths about the life of Helen Keller.

An app that identifies plants when you take a picture. This might have come in handy during a hike earlier this week…

In this article, feminist and journalist Jessica Valenti writes about her — specifically, her young daughter’s — experience with the health care system and how the current bill in the Senate might harm children who have health issues.

Fun video: A dog walks onstage at an outdoor orchestral performance in Turkey.

This article speaks about the need for acceptance of people with autism, not just awareness.

Friday link roundup 5/19

This year’s national Mathcounts champion answered this question correctly:  In a barn, 100 chicks sit peacefully in a circle. Suddenly, each chick randomly pecks the chick immediately to its left or right. What is the expected number of unpecked chicks?

17 Steps for Recognizing and Responding to Signs of Suicide.  I found this article to be very thorough and sensitive. 

A GOP lawmaker asks why men should have to pay for maternity care. A women’s editorial response to his comments is short, to the point, and poignant.

On a fashion/style note, I thought these floral and sparkly fishnets were really cool and fanciful.

There are quite a few clothing companies that sell apparel with feminist messages on them. This article suggests looking at the individual company and seeing if they walk their talk.

There’s a group of scientists that argue that if the asteroid that ultimately led to the extinction of the dinosaurs had hit a few minutes later or earlier, dinosaurs could still be around today. Article here.

 

Friday link roundup 5/5

More details about the health care bill that passed in the House of Representatives yesterday. A full list of “pre-existing conditions.” 

A close bond: Scientists discover children’s cells in mother’s brains. 

On the treatment of women in doctors’ offices.

16 Books for Kids that Challenge Gender Stereotypes.

In September 2017, professor, author, and autism advocate Temple Grandin will be inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

A video that gives food for thought on the way Cinco de Mayo is often celebrated in the United States. 

My healthcare story and reflections on the American Health Care Act bill.

Okay, I’m going to get personal and political about healthcare coverage.

My story:

Over many years in infrequent doctor’s visits, I omitted the fact that my family has a history of depression. I did this partly in order to avoid receiving a diagnosis, to avoid the stigma of the label, and also to avoid having a “pre-existing condition.” My parents were both self-employed and had to buy private insurance, so any diagnosis (especially one I was not seeking conventional medical treatment for) might put that at risk.

After college, I generally had several jobs that included health insurance benefits. After I got laid off in 2011, I was able to apply for private insurance without much of a hassle. At the time, insurance carriers seemed to look for any reason not to cover people — or at least charge more for their care. I was relieved and grateful that I didn’t fall into this category.

But then something else came up: in the late summer of 2013, I discovered I had a tumor on my right ovary. This discovery, along with the subsequent open abdominal surgery, meant that I would have a pre-existing condition. With the beginning of the Affordable Care Act in 2014, I was able to easily get coverage. And with my recovery from the surgery, I also struggled to recover emotionally and fell into a deep depression. I decided to seek further treatment, which included hospitalization and taking medication and later an intensive therapy program.

When I moved back to New Mexico, I qualified for Centennial Care, their Medicaid Program, under the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion. Under this program, I was able to get my Dialectical Behavioral Therapy program covered as well as occupational therapy for my sensory issues. It also covered my preventative care visits, pelvic ultrasounds, and follow-up appointments to make sure the tumor hadn’t returned. I felt so grateful to have these needs met.

These days, I am pretty healthy. I still take antidepressants, and have not had another major episode of depression. So far, my tumor has not returned.

Today, the House of Representatives passed a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. This bill includes changing the current guaranteed protections to pre-existing conditions.

A recent quote from an Alabama congressman: “My understanding is that (the new proposal) will allow insurance companies to require people who have higher health care costs to contribute more to the insurance pool. That helps offset all these costs, thereby reducing the cost to those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people — who’ve done things the right way — that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.”

I see quotes like this and I get frustrated. Honestly, I get frustrated anytime I hear or read something from any side of the political spectrum that implies that people have full control — as if merely being responsible will ensure their good health — whether they’re talking about potential healthcare law changes or holistic healing. In my perspective, yes, there are things I can do (and do do) to help keep myself healthy — but that doesn’t guarantee my continued good health.

Yes, there are people with pre-existing conditions who don’t take care of themselves. There are people out there who have pre-existing conditions because they didn’t take care of themselves. There are also people who can’t afford to take better care of themselves — they do what they can, but they may prioritizing caring for others, and/or need to work two jobs to provide for themselves and their families, etc. And there are people who take care of themselves and do everything “right” and still end up falling ill. And sometimes “pre-existing condition” just means that a person sought out treatment for something they needed medical help with, which resulted in a diagnosis. This can run the gamut of regular, human life experiences, including childbirth. In this so-called healthcare bill, the list of what qualifies as a pre-existing condition goes on. 

Hearing and reading about all these potential changes does scare me on a personal level — it would be a huge financial burden for my husband and me if our healthcare costs went up in order for me to at least get preventative coverage, and that’s not even looking at potential serious health issues in the future. We are currently both covered through his employer, and this bill would likely extend to these benefits as well.

However, I am young and currently healthy. I am concerned for others. There are others whose higher cost or loss of coverage could be the difference between life and death. There are children who are born with pre-existing conditions whose parents might have to make hard decisions. Many people will lose coverage.

The Senate is said to be considering creating another version of the American Health Care Act; in any case, the review of the bill in the Senate is likely to be a longer process. 

If you are concerned about the future of healthcare coverage in the United States, here are some things you can do:
Call, write, or e-mail your Senators.

Write thank-you notes to Congresspeople who voted against the bill.  If your representative voted for it and you disagree with them, let them know (for reference, these are the votes).

Share your story. Write in your social media channels, share in a blog post. Personal stories can make a huge impact.

Friday link roundup 4/7

50 things to say to you child instead of “How was your day?”

In this short film, kids describe their emotions.

How screen time may affect kids’ sensory processing abilities.

How having a transgender child changed this Texas mother’s perspective. Also talks about transgender children in schools, policies, bathrooms, and much more.

In case of emergency: A story (article and video clip) about the seed vault in remote northern Norway, full of seeds from plants from all over the world.

On a matriarchal tribe in southwest China.

In pursuit of a flat stomach? Why having a little belly fat is a good thing for women.

In light of the recent chemical attack in Syria, how chemical attacks impact children.