Posts Tagged ‘dance’

Friday Link Roundup 5/20

How to Avoid the Trap of Self Improvement. How self-compassion and mindfulness may be more important than striving for a set goal.

There are many types of grief. This article addresses three that aren’t often discussed.

I didn’t know Emily Dickinson was an amateur botanist. Knowing this fact kind of makes me want to go back and read her poems in a new light. The Lost Gardens of Emily Dickinson.

“See what it looks like when you teach women in prison to dance.

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Natural Time

As I mentioned in this post, I’m currently focusing on one Nia White Belt principle per month as part of a self-study/continuing education process.

This past month, I focused on Nia Principle #2, Natural Time and Movement Forms.

I’ll start with Natural Time.

Natural time incorporates measurement – the measurement of time and space, of movement.  It calls to attention the 13 main joints of the body and the 20 digits (fingers and toes). It involves one’s pace and staying true to what feels natural (for that particular day, period of life, etc).  We live in a world where time is often rigidly scheduled and regimented. Natural Time gives us permission to let go of that when we can.

When I think of natural time, I think of my own internal rhythm.  I think of slowing down when I need to; not rushing.  I think of being out in nature, where time is relative to the position of the sun and the amount of light.

I think of noticing my pace, how fast I am moving.  How far can I leap?  Or how little?

Rushing does not necessarily help but being conscious and present does.

Natural time helps me be more aware of my joints, how they bend and stretch.  It gives me a better since of the distance between things as I move across the dance floor and through life.  It allows me to become more aware of my own nervous system, and how it needs its own time and space to adapt.  Natural time gives me permission to move, learn, and heal at my own pace.

Stepping in: Teaching my first Nia class

I taught my first full Nia class today. One of my main teachers had a work-related training and asked me to substitute for her. Over the past week, we had gone over the steps of opening and closing the studio, how to hook up and turn on the music and the microphone. As for the content of the class…well, I’ve been learning and practicing for months.

And so this morning, as a hint of snow fell from the sky, I walked into the studio. I was fairly calm as I set things up. There was time to breathe and wait for people to come. Four students came. It was a small class, and enough. 

We stepped in; my focus was play. I asked them shake off anything they didn’t need to keep with them during class. I switched on the music and began. 

Sometimes I felt out of sync, leading with imperfect steps, and I kept going. I know my enthusiasm, my playfulness, my love of Nia came through. Sometimes, I felt so incredibly present – the steps were there and they mattered, but the experience was about so much more than the steps of the choreography. It was about being with myself, being with others, being in the moment,

The body and movement are sources of inspiration, wellness, vitality, vibration, connection. I know that doing Nia as a student helps regulate me; as a teacher, it stretches me to the edge of my capacity and allows me to hold more, even if just for the duration of a class. 

There’s a spiritual element in teaching, too, that feels somewhat akin to leading a centering exercise or a blessing/prayer. I remember being in my White Belt training and realizing that the best way to feel grounded and safe was to be fully in my body; that  through being connected to my body, I could also be more spiritual, emotional, and connected with the energy around me. This connection feels stronger to me when I teach. 

Today, I found my breath at points where it became ragged. I found spaces to step to the side and take sips of water. I found spaces to soften when I needed to. Still, it is a different kind of workout to move while using my voice while my heart is beating quickly, and I have to be very conscious of my breath. I now feel a little stiff, a little more winded than usual. I also feel strong. 

After we were done, after we stepped out, one of my friends – another Nia morning class regular – came up to me and gave me a hug, telling me I did a good job. “I remember when you first taught a song; you seemed unsure and a little unsteady. And now…what a difference.”

I felt exhilarated afterward, and that energy carried me for at least an hour more until I felt the waves of tiredness hit me. This was a big step for me. It is the first full movement class I have ever taught. And it is the first full class of any kind I have taught since I last co-facilitated a class in San Diego nearly two years ago. 

Although I am tired now, I can still feel the sensations of the experience in my body and spirit. I know I want to teach again. I want to continue strengthening my Nia practice as a student and teacher. This practice feeds me, brings me a joy beyond words. 

This language of dance

My breath: ragged. Heart beating quickly. Navigating a new city is a question mark. I try to plan ahead: which lanes turn into right turn only lanes? I ask. My love writes out the route on a piece of lined paper.  As I drive, I realize I can only anticipate so much.

Despite my thoughts, in the midst of my nervous system crying out at the newness of it all, I get there. From the outside, it might even have looked relatively smooth.

I take a deep breath and walk across the parking lot, up the stairs, and I open the door to the yoga studio where the Nia class is held. Breathe. Open. Introduce myself, allow it just to be a simple greeting, allow myself to answer the teacher’s questions.

When I step in, I still feel my system on alert. In time, as I dance, I find my feet and calm my thoughts. I remind myself that while I may have a a future in this city that involves teaching Nia, in this moment, I am mostly here as a student and dancer. I am here with my feet on the ground, and I want to allow myself to be. And in time, I do: finding the rhythm, the movement, my voice.

It’s like finding a piece of home in this city, where the familiar steps of Nia bring me back to myself. I know, even if I feel anxious about putting myself out there, that there is a community waiting for me in the people who speak this language of movement, this language of dance.

Dancer, teacher, energy holder

 

The Nia Technique logo – this necklace was a birthday gift

Another milestone: Last Sunday, I taught at my first Nia dance jam.

The energy at these jams is always high.  Since there are several teachers (6 at this one, including me), there are students from many of the classes, so it’s a greater reflection of the local Nia community.  Although I somtimes attend larger classes, I’m used to my small morning classes, which maybe stretch to 8 people at most.  Larger classes require more body and spatial awareness: how close am I to the person next to me, if I turn or take a step back, how close will I be to them, and will I run into them.  Smaller classes allow more freedom of movement, stretching, taking up space.

Also, each teacher has a different energy and teaching style.  In this case, one teacher is fiery and athletic; another is soft and playful; another is energetic and empathetic, and so on.  We each bring ourselves to the dance floor, and the combination raises the energy of each teacher’s personal style and weaves them together.

When I teach, I have to be aware of the people around me and also give myself permission to take up space.  Put on the headset, use my voice, calm and steady.  Notice if the volume of the microphone on the headset is loud enough in contrast to the music, or if I need to make any adjustments.  Be present, be in the movement, and be with everyone else.

I made a request before the jam: that we, the teachers, connect and set intentions beforehand. We did, and I think that moment helped us move and teach together with more ease.

I was slightly out of breath when it was time for me to teach the cool down songs.  I gradually found my breath, slowed myself down; encouraged everyone to pause, to sense.  The cool down songs in Nia often have more free and softer choreography; there’s an open invitation to rest, to give your body what it needs as the routine winds down.

I had a moment where I made a joke and was able to laugh, where I followed the energy as I led the class from one yoga pose to another. I ended with sending gratitude to the pulse of each person’s heart, to the pulse of community, and to the pulse of life all around us.

I had this great sense of relief and accomplishment after, and a sense of sinking deeper into my Nia teaching practice. I was tired but also high from the energy of dancing in community, and from being an active holder of that energy.

Friday link roundup 2/19

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I found this on Facebook and it resonated with me.

 

Unapologetic Body Love:  A Nia teacher shares a body-positive story and message on Rebelle Society.

Why aren’t there more treatments for menstrual pain and other related symptoms? This article addresses the stigma and lack of research.

St. Louis native and poet uses her words as activism to address issues such as racism, personal and community healing, and love.

Today is a Day of Remembrance: on this date in 1942, the U.S. government gave the order to put Japanese-Americans in internment camps during World War II.

The New York City Ballet held dance workshops for children with disabilities. The video about the process is definitely worth watching.

My hometown, Albuquerque, is hosting Women and Creativity events next month. As part of it, they are inviting people to make art and poetry trading cards to exchange with other participants. You don’t have to be local to join! Go here for more information and to sign up (sign up deadlines are in early March).

Susan Cain, author of Quiet – the bestselling book about the power of introverts – discusses the new book she wrote as a guide for introverted kids and teens, and how it may also benefit educators and parents.

SPD advocate Rachel Schneider released her first book this week! Making Sense is a guidebook for people with sensory issues and their loved ones. Check it out!

Nia routine immersion

Two weeks ago, I went to my first Nia routine immersion. The routine was Pulse, choreographed by Kelle Rae Oien, who was also my White Belt teacher trainer.
The immersion was intense, thorough, and packed with movement and information.

We started with a FreeDance class to the music of Pulse, and then did a class of the full routine. We had a short lunch break followed by several hours of going through the bars, moves, and music of each song. There was space for questions and for experimenting with the katas (a series of moves that form parts of the routine). Repetition to create body memory was a huge part of the process.

It was great to have Kelle teach the routine she created.  I enjoyed hearing her perspective and background on creating the routine, and she shared some tricks to remember the various moves. It’s also fun to watch her fluid and natural movements; she seems incredibly at home in her body. At the end of the day, she showed us a six minute summary of the moves of Pulse.  It was very flowing and Tai-Chi like, and beautiful to watch.

Do I remember all the moves now on my own?  Some of them.  Perhaps more than I give myself credit for. I did the whole routine along with the DVD on Tuesday, with the music but without cueing. Sometimes I would lose my place and then remember by watching the dancers move on screen.  My mind strained to remember the concepts, bars and count.  However, I did realize that the movement and connection to the music was in my body and sometimes it was best to keep moving without so much mental focus. I’m not at a point where I could teach the full routine with ease, but I generally remember a lot of the choreography.  I definitely felt more confident when I dance Pulse now.  I’ll be ready to teach my two songs at the Nia jam (with six other teachers!) in two weeks!

Returning to Studio Nia Santa Fe for the immersion was like returning to one of my Nia homes. After all, I got my White Belt there.  I love the sense of community there. When I walked in, I was greeted by several people almost immediately. It had been six months, almost to the day, since my training ended.  During this day-long workshop, I sat with other Nia teachers and students and felt so grateful to be among them.  It was wonderful to connect, learn, and be immersed in such a nurturing Nia-centered environment.