Posts Tagged ‘links’

Link roundup 5/18

Watching the finale of Game of Thrones with a group this Sunday? Here are a few ideas (somewhat silly, although mostly clever) for some foods to make for a viewing party.

Talking openly about a topic that is often hidden away: A group of eighth grade girls entered their podcast called Sssh! Periods into NPR’s first Student Podcast challenge and won the grand prize for the middle school category.

About a woman who is working to change and expand the conversation around parenting children with autism.

Much of the western United States is currently experiencing lower than normal temperatures. This article from weather.com explains why. (It was around 70 degrees in Vegas today. It would normally be around 90 degrees Fahrenheit this time of year).

Meanwhile, it was 86 degrees near the Arctic Ocean last weekend.

Increasing the visibility of women in science: A group of female scientists created a database to showcase their work. Over 9,000 women joined them.

From Vox: From the latest abortion ban bills to current statistics on abortion, abortion in America explained in ten facts.

According to ABC News, several of the states passing abortion bans have some of the lowest rates of women in power.

What you can do to help women in states with extreme abortion bans.

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Friday link roundup 4/26

Looking for a good book (or two, or five, or…) to read as summer approaches? Here is NPR’s guide to 2018’s greatest reads.

Lego releases new bricks to teach braille to blind and visually impaired children.

A physicist and his mother are worker together to translate astrophysics into the indigenous Blackfoot language.

An article from the Atlantic about the double-bind of charisma vs. competence that women who run for political office (in this case, president) often face, especially under the scrutiny of the media.

Link roundup 4/19

While I still occasionally gather links, I haven’t posted one of these in a while. I miss doing it on a regular basis. But I’m on spring break and I had time to gather these!

The oldest living person with HIV turns 100.

Why don’t we cook meals for friends struggling with mental health?

An art historian’s digital mapping of Notre Dame Cathedral may help restore it.

Donations up for black churches that were recently burned in Louisiana have gone up since the fire at Notre Dame. Here is the GoFundMe site to donate.

From NPR: Some highlights from the Mueller report (Or lowlights, depending on how you view it).

Link roundup 1/11

Oh, the Friday link roundup. I used to post it weekly and now it’s only occasionally. My goal is to post one at least once a month.

Scientists regenerated a ~32,000-year-old seed.

Especially this time of year, there’s so much out there about how to be more healthy, more fit, what to eat, etc., etc. This article explores the “cult” – or the business – of wellness and how all the advertising and consumption of products may not be helpful.

New York City bans plastic foam containers, effective this summer.

A great article on the new Netflix show Tidying up with Marie Kondo. I haven’t watched it yet, but this article definitely made me more interested in it. 

Tennessee governor granted clemency to Cyntoia Brown, who will be released from prison this August. She was originally convicted for killing a man in self-defense when she was 16 and she has served 15 years of what would be a 55-year sentence. As a result of her case, there is legislation in the works that focuses on self-defense for child sex victims.

From The Washington Post: Everything you need to know about the U.S. government shutdown. It has basic FAQs, updates, and addresses how the shutdown may affect people.

Link roundup 8/3

From The Boston Globe: Motherhood brings the most dramatic brain changes of a woman’s life.

Hamilton co-creators receive special honors from the Kennedy Center.

Instead of (or in addition to) having a baby shower, why a postpartum party might be more helpful for new mothers.

Clean green public spaces may make us happier.

An ad from Nature Valley: Three generations were asked what they did for fun as children. From blueberry picking to technology, the contrast is striking.

This weekend is a tax-free weekend in some states. Click here to see if your state is included and what items might be tax-free.

On Twitter, questions on an practice exam for medical students, and a bias towards not believing women about their own symptoms.

On a recent hot summer’s day, someone found a deer in their pool .

Friday link roundup 7/6

According to the Associated Press, the U.S. Army is quietly discharging immigrant recruits.

Several suspected rhino poachers were killed and eaten by lions on a South African game reserve.

Bleak stories of family separation.

Halsey’s powerful spoken word poem about sexual abuse from the Women’s March in New York City earlier this year. Both the video and the written out poem are there if you prefer to read rather than watch (or vice versa).

Seattle just passed a ban on disposable plastic straws, and other cities are considering similar restrictions. From Upworthy: On accessibility, disability, and  the downside to banning straws.

New York and Virginia just passed laws that mandate including mental health education as part of health class curriculum in schools.

Summer reads: 10 books Amazon editors recommend this July.

Friday link roundup 6/29

This week, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won the Democratic primary for New York City’s 14th congressional district. This article describes the powerful design choices of her campaign. Here is her campaign video — I definitely found it inspiring.

5 ways to help someone in a mental health emergency without calling the police.

Every body is a beach body. Tips on how to rock your body no matter what its size and shape this summer.

How to talk about immigration and family separation effectively.

An interview with author Elizabeth Gilbert on choosing curiosity instead of fear.

How silence is vital to our brains.

An exhibit at the U.S. Department of Education headquarters in Washington, D.C., features artwork by young people about racism, sexism, and diversity. This interview/article from NPR features several of the artists.