Posts Tagged ‘mental health’

Friday link roundup 4/21

Netflix has released a series called 13 Reasons Why, based on the book by the same name. While I’ve read plot synopses, I’ve never read or watched either one (my choice). The story is centers around a teenager who dies by suicide and the tapes she leaves behind to describe what (and who) contributed to her decision. I’m sharing articles about the series because the show addresses sensitive topics, and I think raising mental health and suicide awareness is important — and it’s also important to make an informed decision on whether to watch the show (or things to consider if you do). So, trigger warning in these articles for mentions and discussions of suicide, rape, and sexual harassment and assault.  A guide to the series for parents and teachers.  First-person articles from people who have watched it: Why I Wish I Didn’t Watch ’13 Reasons Why.’  4 Important Lessons From ’13 Reasons Why.’  About the show’s visual choices and using teen iconography.  From someone who lost a friend as a teen: 13 Reasons Why Tells a Captivating Story, but Not My Story.  How the show’s promise to raise teen mental health awareness backfired.  On how the show addresses rape culture.

Have some nostalgia with a show that depicts the background of an infamous fictional thief: A future Netflix release that might excite people who grew up in the ’90s: Carmen Sandiego! I don’t know how many hours I spent playing “Where in the World…” then “Where in Time…” on my computer, in addition to watching the PBS game show. I think I also watched the cartoon series a few times, too.

Creative Action Network: A global community of artist and designers making art with purpose. Plus, you can submit your own art that follow the different sayings and themes!

Live updates of the March for Science from all around the world.

There’s a theory that there are four types of introversion.

A few reactions to Starbucks’ limited-time-only Unicorn Frappuccino. What I’ve heard from people I know: “It’s sweet,” and “I’m not sure about this…”

Recognizing my experience of depression in the pages of the DSM-V

A few weeks ago, my assignment for my Abnormal Psychology class – choosing a disorder and writing about it from a specific therapeutic perspective – gave me a reason to look through the DSM-V, the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. I went to the local library, sat down with their reference copy, and flipped through the pages. I skimmed the criteria of different disorders, searching for one that might seem intriguing, but not too triggering or something that I have directly experienced.

Major Depressive Disorder did not meet my second requirement; nonetheless, I stopped skimming and read through the criteria. And as I read, I recognized that two and a half to three years ago, I met nearly every point of the criteria, line by line. Part of me suspected this, but I hadn’t looked it up, not even in my old copy of the DSM-IV that I’ve had for years. If the page had been a checklist, it would have been full of check marks.

On one hand, the realization was sobering: I was severely depressed. That’s scary and serious.

On the other hand, I can also say that it’s factual, it’s true, and that reading the criteria simply confirmed what I already knew. I had a depressive episode, the worst I’d ever had. I acknowledge that before I experienced that episode, I likely struggled with mild depression, or dysthymia, on and off for years, perhaps since I was a teenager.

Alternately, I can also look at it like this: I was severely depressed. I went back to my hometown. There, I got the help and support I needed. I don’t know if I can say that I am necessarily better off because of my depression, but the support I got helped me get to where I am today. I like and appreciate my life now.

There is also something validating in seeing what I experienced written in words on a page. It tells me that other people have experienced this, that people have researched it, that treatment continues to be looked at and further developed.

I do recognize that a diagnosis is primarily a measurement used for medical, prescriptive, and insurance reasons. It isn’t consistently a defining factor in my life; at this point, the main thing is that I take two pills each morning. I also keep better track of my moods and I regularly use skills to deal with challenging situations and emotions.

I remind myself that I don’t have to make too much meaning out of the pages of the DSM; it’s a reference manual used in certain contexts. I know that if I experience and recognize the symptoms of depression again, I am more equipped to deal with it. I am therefore less likely to experience another major depressive episode. And that’s what really matters to me.

Friday link roundup 3/3

Outerwear that would be great for refugees in camps, homeless people, campers, and more. The company Adiff’s humanitarian-oriented inventions including reflective jackets and jackets that turn into tents or sleeping bags. Here’s their kickstarter campaign.

An Iraqi artist in the Australian refugee detention center on Nauru describes how his art saves him.

Ten books to read when you’re feeling anxious.

“Is she literally a cat?” Playboy’s (suprisingly) insightful flow chart about whether to catcall women.

A track-by-track guide to Tori Amos’ acclaimed album Little Earthquakes from Rolling Stone. 

How a girl from a remote Nepali village became a world-class trail runner.

The most common job in every state.  A look at the most common jobs in each U.S. state from 1978 to 2014.

Research shows that artists have structurally different brains.
On March 8, many  women in the United States are planning on participating in a strike to demonstrate the impact of women workers. How to spend March 8 – “A Day Without a Woman” – if you can’t take the day off.

Friday link roundup 2/10

According to Emily’s List, since the election in November, more than 4,000 women have said they want to run for office.

From the Huffington Post: 13 free online mental health resources.

#NeverthelessShePersisted: Examples of women who have stood up for what they believe in and persisted. Since Elizabeth Warren was silenced in the Senate earlier this week, “Nevertheless, she persisted” has become a rallying cry for those who oppose the current administration’s policies.

Students from a vocational high school are building tiny homes for flood victims in West Virginia.

An unusual court sentence for a group of teenagers who wrote racist and sexist graffiti on a historic schoolhouse in Virginia:  a reading list and book reports that may help them gain awareness about diversity, discrimination, and history.

To add some cuteness to your Friday: In this video,  a cat interrupts a weather forecast broadcast to request cuddles.

Friday link roundup 12/16

From Everyday Feminism: Thoughts on the question,”What do you do for a living?” 

A photographer has created quite a juxtaposition with his portraits of ballet dancers on the streets of New York City.

An article that celebrates a life of a woman who lived her dreams even as she knew that her diagnosis of cystic fibrosis would shorten her lifespan.

The news from Aleppo, Syria this week has been horrifying. Wondering how to help? This article from the Huffington Post suggests several organizations to donate to that may fund direct services and action.

From NAMI: On the 21st Century Cures Act, and how it could improve mental health services in the United States.

A tribute to the people – artists, musicians, activists, community organizers and others – who lost their lives in the fire at the Ghost Ship Warehouse in Oakland, California on December 2nd.

Friday link roundup 12/2

Next week, I’ll be doing a special holiday-themed Friday link roundup. This is an open call to send me your links for holiday-related posts, gift guides, tips, news, and more. You can contact me through the form here.

Also, I’m considering doing at least one link roundup with a specific theme each month, so if you have ideas for future ones, I’d welcome those as well. Thanks!

In the meantime, here are this week’s links:

What does embodiment mean to you? 20 yogis and dancers describe what embodiment means to them.

One way to counter-protest a rally: dress up as clowns.

The FDA has given the green light to continue a trial of using a “party drug” as a treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

An update on the wildfire in Tennessee.

A study finds that deforestation in the Amazon rainforest is up 29% from last year.

Close to 2,000 veterans arrive at Standing Rock to act as “human shields” for water protectors.

Research before reacting: A video on the importance of fact-checking information shared on social media.

Spotify has just released an ad campaign with billboards and posters that include commentary on people’s music listening habits.  One example to show you the quirky humor of these ads: “Dear person who made a playlist called ‘One Night Stand with Jeb Bush like He’s a Bond Girl in a European Casino,’ we have so many questions. Thanks, 2016, it’s been weird.”

Friday link roundup 10/14

In Arizona, drive-thru restaurant Salad and Go provides a quick and easy alternative to traditional fast food.

Ever heard someone say, “I’m being so OCD” or something along those lines? This article describes the real experiences of people living with obsessive compulsive disorder.

Women respond to men who told them to smile.

On October 13, Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in literature. This page from The Guardian includes responses from various sources on this momentous occasion.

From Upworthy: A dad reflects on Donald Trump’s comments in a letter to his young sons, and makes powerful points about men and masculinity.

An obituary to the Great Barrier Reef has gone viral on social media channels. Scientists protest the article’s message and argue that while it is damaged and dying, it is not dead, and there could still be hope.