Posts Tagged ‘women’

Friday link roundup 6/2

Need a dose of laughter? 14 female cartoonists to follow.

From Buzzfeed:  a week of lunches on a $20 budget.

In light of the president withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, mayors of numerous U.S. cities are affirming their commitment to it.

This piece from NPR looks at five things that could possibly change (in the U.S. and worldwide) in response to the U.S. withdrawing from the climate deal.

A reflection of the history of the Golden Gate Bridge as it turns 80.

Wonder Woman comes out in theaters today and is getting good reviews. A review with thoughts on female representation. This article reflects on whether Wonder Woman will change the luck (and prevalence) of superhero movies starring female characters.

Today is apparently National Doughnut Day in the U.S. Here’s a list of places that are offering deals (free, or free with purchase). Now, if you’ll excuse me while I go satisfy that sudden (and effectively marketed) craving….

 

Friday link roundup 5/5

More details about the health care bill that passed in the House of Representatives yesterday. A full list of “pre-existing conditions.” 

A close bond: Scientists discover children’s cells in mother’s brains. 

On the treatment of women in doctors’ offices.

16 Books for Kids that Challenge Gender Stereotypes.

In September 2017, professor, author, and autism advocate Temple Grandin will be inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

A video that gives food for thought on the way Cinco de Mayo is often celebrated in the United States. 

Friday link roundup 4/7

50 things to say to you child instead of “How was your day?”

In this short film, kids describe their emotions.

How screen time may affect kids’ sensory processing abilities.

How having a transgender child changed this Texas mother’s perspective. Also talks about transgender children in schools, policies, bathrooms, and much more.

In case of emergency: A story (article and video clip) about the seed vault in remote northern Norway, full of seeds from plants from all over the world.

On a matriarchal tribe in southwest China.

In pursuit of a flat stomach? Why having a little belly fat is a good thing for women.

In light of the recent chemical attack in Syria, how chemical attacks impact children.

Link roundup

I didn’t getting around to posting links yesterday. I did, however, go to an art/open mic-like event and sold some of my art and jewelry!

Now on to the links!

Obituaries of two inspiring women:  Shirley Childress, deaf rights activist, and camerawoman/photojournalist Margaret Moth (this one is from years ago, but still a stunning portrait).

Different types of exercise affect different parts of the brain.

One person’s therapy journey and three tips for finding a good therapist.

How several of the London Tube stops got their names.

Volcanoes have long been the subject of fascination in many different disciplines, from science to literature to art. A BBC reporter investigates why volcanoes are so compelling.

Friday link roundup 3/10

Iceland becomes the first country to make equal pay mandatory.

Slovenia adds the right to drinkable water to their constitution.

An Iranian playwright wrote a play about the refugee detention centers in Australia.

At five years old, a girl from Oklahoma becomes the youngest person to qualify for the National Spelling Bee.

A bookstore decided to demonstrate how sexism affects the publishing industry by flipping books written by men around. The result is eye-opening.

On the Native Nations Rise march for indigenous rights.

Photos and commentary from “A Day without A Woman”/International Women’s Day throughout the United States.

Friday link roundup 1/27

In terms of activism, this article from Everyday Feminism explains why marching isn’t the only way.

Making history:  Museums from all around the world have been collecting signs from the women’s marches.

Have an opinion about an issue, and have difficulty with the idea of calling your senators and representatives? This post gives tips for people with social anxiety. I personally think it could be helpful for anyone who might need to reserve energy for these types of things.

Want to write a letter to Congress? This site gives tips on how to write an effective letter so that your voice is more likely to be heard.

How to Stay Outraged without Losing Your Mind: this post gives some good tips on how to stay aware and active under the current political climate without burning out. Self-care and occasionally unplugging are part of this, too.

A study shows that girls as young as six may already have gendered beliefs about intelligence.

Thanks to recent rain and show, California’s drought is finally coming to an end.

Friday link roundup 1/20

A study found that women only said 26% of the words in the biggest movies in 2016.

Thousands will be in Washington D.C. tomorrow for the Women’s March on Washington. Here are ideas on how to support the movement from home.

The Woman’s March has gone global; here is an article about the rallies in Scandinavia.

After posting yesterday, I was happy to see this article: For people who might not have the physical ability or stamina to join Saturday’s marches and rallies, activists created the Disability March so participants can participate virtually.  On this website, people can post their pictures and share why they’re marching.

Heroine: Women’s Creative Leadership is a regular podcast on women, leadership, creativity, and more.

Canadian musician Buffy Sainte-Marie is being recognized for her dedication to protecting Indigenous communities and intellectual property.